New Integrated approach to be taken for Fisheries, Pollution and Habitat Protection in the Southern Caribbean and North Brazil Shelf

Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago | 20-24 November 2017

The marine area of the Caribbean and North Brazil Shelf Large Marine Ecosystems (the CLME+ region) are bordered by over 35 States and Territories. These countries are heavily dependent on this region for economic developmentfrom activities such as fisheries, tourism, shipping and off-shore oil exploration.

The CLME+ region is regarded as one of the most geo politically diverse and complex sets of Large Marine Ecosystems (LMEs) in the world. The culturally diverse countries and territories that border this maritime area range from among the largest (e.g. Brazil, USA) to among the smallest (e.g. Barbados, St. Kitts and Nevis) and from the most developed to the least developed in the world.

The region’s marine resources and the main environmental problems affecting these resources (over fishing, pollution, habitat degradation and climate change) are shared by the many territories that make up this region.   A more integrated approach to the management of coastal and marine resources (Ecosystem-Based Management) is being recommended as one approach to support improved sustainable use and management of the region’s critical coastal and marine resources.

Discussions on the implementation of two projects for the Southern Caribbean and North Brazil Shelf coordinated by UN Environment and the FAO respectively using this Ecosystem Approach will occur during a week-long regional workshop opening today (Monday 20th November) in Trinidad and Tobago.

The workshop is being organized by the UN Environment - Caribbean Environment Programme (CEP), the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and the Institute of Marine Affairs.   Funding is being provided by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Global Environment Facility (GEF) funded Caribbean Large Marine Ecosystem Management + (CLME+) Project.

Pollution forms oil, plastic, excessive nutrients, algal leading to fish kills in Cunupia, Trinidad

Pollution forms oil, plastic, excessive nutrients, algal leading to fish kills in Cunupia, Trinidad

The two projects valued at over USD 1,000,000 which will be implemented by UN Environment and FAO respectively over the next three years,will support improved management measures and local technological solutions for the management of shrimp and ground fisheries, reducing pollution from land-based activities, and restoring degraded coastal and marine habitats. The beneficiary countries include Brazil, Guyana, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, Venezuela and Colombia with collaboration also expected with French Guiana.

Over 30 participants representing Governments experts, Non-Governmental Organizations, Community based organizations and other stakeholder groups are expected to attend.  The collaboration between UN Environment, FAO and other regional partners will enhance linkages between fisheries and environment agencies to mitigate pollution within coastal mangroves, wetlands and nearshore fishing grounds.

Large Marine Ecosystem Fisheries Strategy Meeting in Mexico in 2017 (70th Annual Conference of the Gulf and Caribbean Fisheries Institute)

Large Marine Ecosystem Fisheries Strategy Meeting in Mexico in 2017 (70th Annual Conference of the Gulf and Caribbean Fisheries Institute)

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